Hoarwithy, Herefordshire & The Wye Valley

Hoarwithy

An unspoiled village in the Wye Valley, an 'Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty'. Famous for The New Harp Inn and Italianate church on the hill. Hoarwithy is a half a mile down the lane from the Wagons, following the Brook towards the Wye. The cosy local pub serves local ales and cider, good food and has a very friendly welcome.

The New Harp Inn also houses the village shop, extensively stocked with all the basics and more from fresh meat, cheeses, butter, bacon, milk and eggs, to tins, homebaked bread, fruit and vegetables, even toiletries. They also carry postcards and stamps. The shop is open every day, the same hours as the pub.

Other Picturesque Pubs

A mile and a half away is the Loughpool Inn - full of character, charm and tempting food. Along the river about three miles the other way is the Cottage of Content, another very popular and quaint local foodie pub.


Ross-on-Wye

Our nearest town (6 Miles) is the historic centre of the tourist industry in Britain. William Gilpin wrote the first book for tourists about the beauties of the Wye Valley from Ross to Chepstow. Likening these local views of the truly picturesque to those of the Grand European tour. There is a seventeenth century market house and river side pubs to explore.

Hereford

9 Miles away is a historic, if tiny, city with lots going on. Visit the Cathedral, where the famous 'Mappa Mundi' is on display.






Forest of Dean

Ancient oak woodland where you can walk the Sculpture Trail or through Puzzle Wood and if you're adventurous, you can hire Mountain Bikes for the miles of off road trails.


Symonds Yat

On a huge horse shoe bend in the River Wye where the Peregrines nest on the 150 foot lime stone cliffs. A nationally renowned beauty spot.

Hay-on-Wye

On the edge of the Brecon Beacons, World famous for its book shops and home to the Hay Festival.

The Wye Valley

William Gilpin, in 1782, wrote the first ever English tourist guide entitled " Observations on the River Wye". This volume is agreed to have heralded the birth of British tourism. He described the beauty of this area as: 

Truly picturesque

William Wordsworth described the valley with these words:

These beauteous forms,
Through a long absence, have not been to me
As is a landscape to a blind man's eye:
But oft, in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din
Of towns and cities, I have owed to them,
In hours of weariness, sensations sweet,

[Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, On Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour. July 13, 1798]

More recently, in the Guardian, Sally Shalam wrote:

Wriggles Brook feels like a little slice of heaven.

[The Guardian, 2011]